WSU is advancing Washington industries …
WSU teams with aviation to develop sustainable aviation biofuels …
WSU partners to develop bioproducts that reduce dependence on petroleum imports …
WSU works with state commodity commissions to conduct needed agricultural research …
WSU developed the technology used for wood-plastic composites used for buildings …
WSU researchers work to improve dairy productivity and reduce disease …
WSU research has made Washington one of the world’s most productive wheat-growing regions …

In the News

What the Special Session Means for You

What the Special Session Means for You

School’s out for summer! And normally, by this time, the legislature is, too. But due to the ongoing discussions between differing versions of the state budget, including funding for Washington State University, some of the lawmakers will be staying on the west side of the mountains a little bit longer. The result once they reach agreement? A two-year budget to fund items like WSU, the State Need Grant, and other important state priorities.

The special session, which began in late April and lasts 30 days, gives elected officials more time to talk through the budget proposals and reach a compromise. This year, as it was last year and the year before, the main sticking point is the McCleary decision; lawmakers are charged with figuring out how to fully fund public education at the K-12 level.

But of course, the state budget also includes plenty of other critical line-items, like funding for higher education. These public dollars go directly toward supporting public baccalaureate institutions like Washington State University so they can continue to teach and train students for and conduct research—you know, the kind that makes local and international news!—and solve real-world problems in our communities.

By funding higher ed and WSU, we collectively agree to invest in the future of the state by providing students with work-ready degrees in fields like media, education, and the arts, that support the well-being of communities like Pullman, Tri-Cities, Spokane, and Vancouver. WSU graduates go on to fight hunger, solve environmental problems, build infrastructure, help agricultural professionals, teach students, volunteer in local non-profits, and innovate in medicine and health care, science, engineering, veterinary medicine, and technology.

Fortunately, the current versions of the Washington State budget looks pretty rosy for WSU, with funding proposed for STEM-based educational opportunities for students . And, the proposed budgets include funding the Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine and its charter class of 60 students who will start their medical education this coming August. 

However, the different budgets now need to be reconciled. It’s crunch time for these discussions, and your lawmakers need to hear from you. With summer on the way and another school year just around the corner, we need to plan for the future and make sure our students have what they need to succeed and thrive.
Tell your elected officials what higher ed funding means to you. 

WSU Impact makes it easy to contact your lawmakers and let them know what you’re thinking. Register to join our easy portal and we’ll help you do the rest. Then, stay connected with @WSUImpact on Twitter and Facebook.

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